The underlying philosophy behind a case of breach of contract may seem fairly simple: a contracted party feels as though their partner has not lived up to the terms of the agreement, and thus seeks civil action to terminate the agreement, enforce the contract’s terms and/or seek damages to cover its losses. Yet oftentimes, an aggrieved party may feel it is in their best interest to work with a contracted partner to resolves any pending issues. This may be in an effort to preserve the business relationship, or out of concern of not getting anything out of the agreement. 

Yet even in cases where a contracted partner demonstrates patience with another, that patience may have limits. Those have apparently been reached in the case of a professional horse trainer and his ongoing dispute with a renowned racehorse owner. The trainer had originally agreed to train eight of the owner’s horses, yet he claims that during the period they worked together, the owner accumulated a bill of over $120,000 in unpaid training bills. The trainer had originally attempted to reach a settlement over the arrears, yet the owner failed to make the first of the settlement payments. It was after that the trainer had decided he had enough and sued for both fraud and breach of contract. 

From a high-level perspective, proving breach of contract might seem easy: all one has to show is that the other side did not meet their contractual obligations. Yet there can be a number of complexities that can arise when making such a case. For this reason, having an experienced attorney on one’s side may prove to be a great benefit.